The Turkish-owned, Liberian-flagged MV Karadeniz Powership Rauf Bey anchored in Port Sudan. (Courtesy photo)

Port Sudan plagued by persistent power outages

Residents of Port Sudan have expressed frustration over frequent power outages lasting up to 6 hours a day, with some areas experiencing even longer interruptions.

Residents of Port Sudan have expressed frustration over frequent power outages lasting up to 6 hours a day, with some areas experiencing even longer interruptions.

The outages which began last week affect various neighborhoods and cause significant disruptions to essential services, greatly impacting residents’ lives.

Compounding the issue, Port Sudan is currently experiencing a substantial heatwave as summer approaches.

The city relies on electricity supplied by Turkish power ships operating off the Red Sea coast. However, efforts to reach the management of the Turkish firm to understand the reasons for the outages have been unsuccessful.

Sources informed Radio Tamazuj that the outages are due to maintenance work on one of the electricity generation ships.

Omar Adam, a Port Sudan resident, told this publication that power supply is intermittent.

“Power outages vary from one area to another. There is a need for consistent electricity, especially for patients and children, amidst the soaring temperatures,” he stated. “Temperatures have been rising lately and we hope that this year’s power outages will not be as severe as last year.”

Mohammed Esam who now resides in the city after being displaced by the ongoing war, said the electricity outages had become unbearable.

“I am a displaced person renting an apartment for 50,000 Sudanese Pounds per day and we have to endure power outages lasting 12 or 13 hours a day,” he lamented. “I spend a third of my day outside the house or in the street, unable to work due to power outages.”

A journalist, Salih Al-Daw, who was also displaced by the ongoing conflict, said the blackouts have affected his work.

“Due to the frequent power cuts, I am currently on the streets and this has greatly affected us,” he bemoaned. “I and my colleagues are suffering from power cuts and extremely high temperatures, leading to a halt in our work due to the electricity disruptions.”

This publication saw a press release from the Sudanese Ministry of Oil which announced the completion of integrating electricity from the solar power station at the Northern Cement Factory in Al-Damar on Thursday evening.

The statement indicated that the capacity integrated until Friday amounted to 34 megawatts from the solar station, resulting in the operation of cement factories during daylight hours and a reduction in power outage hours.

“This capacity integration marks the first phase, with expectations for the completion of the second phase by integrating the design capacity of the station soon,” the statement said.